Tag Archives: Twins

A double life

Via @APA

By Lea Winerman

In an interview with Nancy Segal (pictured above), Lea Winerman discovers the mystery of twins. Things that can be considered as ”coincidences” in two individuals who share the same appearance, but are obviously two very different individuals. As a psychologist and a twin, Nancy spent her career studying what makes identical twins unique. This included indepth study of nature vs nurture issues – what role our genes and environment play in shaping us.

Read the article and discover these ”coincidences” that can happen to twins separated at birth and who, later in life, discover each other, only to find strange similarities in their lives, despite having been apart for most of their lives.

This article makes for interesting reading indeed.

A double life

The excerpt below via APA.

”As a child, Nancy Segal, PhD, knew that she was a twin, but she didn’t always feel like one. She and her sister, fraternal twins, didn’t look anything alike and had few interests in common. Meanwhile, a set of identical twins whom she knew from school seemed incredibly similar and in tune with one another.

Segal was fascinated by the contrast. “I would think: My sister and I have the same parents, the same school, some of the same friends — why are we so different?”

Years later, in graduate school, Segal turned her attention to studying the topic that had fascinated her since childhood. In the 1980’s and ’90’s, she worked on the landmark Minnesota Study of Twins Reared Apart. That research, which looked at identical twins who were reared apart and only met as adults, found remarkable similarities between those virtual strangers, suggesting that genes strongly influence aspects of our personality, intelligence and other traits that had long been thought to be mainly shaped by environment.

Today, Segal continues to study twins reared apart, as well as other “twin-like” pairs, such as look-alike but unrelated “doppelgangers,” to see what they can tell us about how genes and environment affect both twins and everyone else.”

Visit the American Psychological Association and read the full article. Click here.

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