Tag Archives: Environment

12 Common Triggers Of Autoimmune Disease

 

Facts of Autoimmune Diseases

Autoimmune Diseases are something we are hearing more and more about. This is not only an ”American” or ”European” problem anymore. Prevalence has increased exponentially on a global level. Just consider how many times in the past few months you’ve heard a family member or friend complain about some of the symptoms in the infograph below? How many times did these people visit doctors, been referred to specialists, yet still failed to be properly diagnosed?

Symptoms of Autoimmune Disorder

Dr William Cole is an expert in the field and he recently wrote an article for MindBodyGreen about this global explosion of AID. He also explained how one can reverse the multiple symptoms an affected person experiences. In the article below he continues on the subject of AID by discussing 12 triggers of autoimmune disease.

Via MindBodyGreen

”Autoimmune conditions have grown rapidly the over past years, with more than 50 million Americans living with some sort of autoimmune disorder.……………………

………I want to go over the top triggers that can flare up an autoimmune response and cause devastating symptoms in the body.

From full-blown autoimmune diseases like Crohn’s, celiac or Hashimoto’s disease to common “autoimmune spectrum disorders” like acne, or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), it’s important to know what the potential “land mines” are that can turn on an inflammatory-immune response in your body:

1. Gluten

The infamous “G” word is a protein that’s found in wheat, barley, spelt, rye and other grains. This protein is linked in many different studies to an increase risk of autoimmunity…….

2. Gluten-free grains

Many people with autoimmune problems already avoid gluten, but still consume foods like corn, oats and rice. As well-intentioned as that decision may be, these grains can be just as damaging as gluten, or even more damaging…………………..

3. Quinoa

A favorite in the health community, pseudo-grains like quinoa are high in proteins called saponins which can damage the gut lining, causing an immune response in the body…………

4. Stress

Stress has many far-reaching effects on your health; one of them is your immune system. Research has found chronic mental stress to be a trigger for autoimmune diseases……………

5. Toxins

Our environment has been bombarded with toxins that were unknown 100 years ago. Studies have shown toxins play a rolein autoimmune cases such as autoimmune thyroiditis.

6. Sugar

It should be no surprise that sugar is on this list, but I’m not just talking about the stereotypical junk food………………….

7. Chocolate

This yummy food can cause a lot of damage to someone living with an autoimmune condition…………….

8. Dairy

Casein, the main protein found in milk and other dairy products, can be a trigger for runaway inflammation in the body………………

9. Nightshades

A plant group that consists of tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, eggplants, goji berries and some spices contains alkaloids in their skin which can cause an inflammatory response in the body………………

10. SIBO

Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, or SIBO, occurs when normal bacteria of the microbiome grow from the large intestines where they belong into the small intestines.

11. Weakened microbiome

The majority of your immune system resides in what’s referred to as the microbiome. This highly sophisticated gut ecosystem consists of trillions of bacteria colonies……………….

12. Leaky gut syndrome

Functional medicine considers an increased permeability to the gut lining, or a “leaky gut,” a precursor to autoimmunity………………”

Please click here to read the full article by dr Cole on http://www.MindBodyGreen.com.

Dr Cole also adds that he investigated cases of AID all around the world, ”customizing personalized plans for the individual.”

If you are still wondering what diseases can be considered autoimmune disorders, have a look at the table, compiled by The Richmond Institute, below. It lists some of the most common autoimmune diseases diagnosed by practitioners today.

List of AID's by Richmond Institute

Original article: 12 Common Triggers Of Autoimmune Disease by dr William Cole.

 

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A double life

Via @APA

By Lea Winerman

In an interview with Nancy Segal (pictured above), Lea Winerman discovers the mystery of twins. Things that can be considered as ”coincidences” in two individuals who share the same appearance, but are obviously two very different individuals. As a psychologist and a twin, Nancy spent her career studying what makes identical twins unique. This included indepth study of nature vs nurture issues – what role our genes and environment play in shaping us.

Read the article and discover these ”coincidences” that can happen to twins separated at birth and who, later in life, discover each other, only to find strange similarities in their lives, despite having been apart for most of their lives.

This article makes for interesting reading indeed.

A double life

The excerpt below via APA.

”As a child, Nancy Segal, PhD, knew that she was a twin, but she didn’t always feel like one. She and her sister, fraternal twins, didn’t look anything alike and had few interests in common. Meanwhile, a set of identical twins whom she knew from school seemed incredibly similar and in tune with one another.

Segal was fascinated by the contrast. “I would think: My sister and I have the same parents, the same school, some of the same friends — why are we so different?”

Years later, in graduate school, Segal turned her attention to studying the topic that had fascinated her since childhood. In the 1980’s and ’90’s, she worked on the landmark Minnesota Study of Twins Reared Apart. That research, which looked at identical twins who were reared apart and only met as adults, found remarkable similarities between those virtual strangers, suggesting that genes strongly influence aspects of our personality, intelligence and other traits that had long been thought to be mainly shaped by environment.

Today, Segal continues to study twins reared apart, as well as other “twin-like” pairs, such as look-alike but unrelated “doppelgangers,” to see what they can tell us about how genes and environment affect both twins and everyone else.”

Visit the American Psychological Association and read the full article. Click here.

Climate change will have broad psychological effects, report finds

@APA @ecoAmerica #MeighenSpeiser #ClimateChange #Environment #HealthImpact

Via Climate change will have broad psychological effects, report finds.

Climate change will have broad psychological effects, report finds

Stress, anxiety, PTSD among likely impacts to overall well-being

 

Climate change will have significant negative impacts on Americans’ health and psychological well-being, due to an increase in the frequency and severity of climate-related natural disasters and other climate-related changes in the environment and weather. Likely effects, which will increase as climate change’s physical impacts accelerate, include stress, anxiety, depression and a loss of community identity, says a new report from the American Psychological Association and ecoAmerica.

Climate change is also likely to result in an increase in post-traumatic stress disorder and other mental health conditions because of the rise in the number and severity of natural disasters, according to the report. Climate change could also lead to increased feelings of loss and helplessness if individuals and communities are forced to relocate.

“The striking thing is how these effects will permeate so many aspects of our daily lives,” said Norman B. Anderson, PhD, CEO of the American Psychological Association. “The effects we are likely to see aren’t just trauma from experiencing natural disasters. We can also expect increases in long-term stress and anxiety from the aftermath of disasters, as well as increases in violence and crime rates as a result of higher temperatures or competition for scarce resources.”

The report, which was produced in collaboration with College of Wooster psychology professor Susan Clayton, PhD, Macalester College environmental studies professor Christie Manning, PhD, and ecoAmerica researcher Caroline Hodge, also recommends actions that individuals and communities can take to address the psychological impacts of climate change.

“There are a number of things communities can do to prepare for acute impacts of climate change — such as hurricanes and wildfires — as well as the slowly evolving changes like droughts that permanently and profoundly affect communities,” said Bob Perkowitz, president of ecoAmerica. “Virtually everything a community does to prepare for or help prevent climate change has co-benefits, like increased community cohesion, increased health and well-being, and risk reduction.”

According to the report, certain populations and communities will be especially vulnerable to mental health impacts. Studies have shown that women, children and the elderly are particularly at risk for serious and long-lasting psychological effects. And communities with poor infrastructure may experience worse physical — and consequent psychological — impacts.

The report outlines steps people and communities can take to buffer themselves against psychological and mental health impacts from climate-change related events. One recommendation is for city planners and health officials to put resources toward strengthening collaboration with existing community and social networks, like neighborhood or faith-based groups. These groups can serve as important sources of social support before, during and after disasters.

The report emphasizes that taking steps to prepare for these effects can lead to other benefits, such as stronger community cohesion and reduced disaster risk.

Perkowitz said he hopes the report will deepen public understanding of climate change, and help the communities around the U.S. understand what they need to do to respond. “Some of these psychological impacts are alarming,” he said. “But by carefully planning for these effects, and helping people understand what we can do to move toward climate solutions, we’ll be prepared to meet this challenge and make our country stronger as a result.”

Visit the ecoAmerica website to read the report.

Meighen Speiser can be contacted by email or by phone at (202) 457-1900.

About ecoAmerica

ecoAmerica grows the base of popular support for climate solutions in America with research-driven marketing, partnerships and national programs that connect with Americans’ core values to bring about and support change in personal and civic choices and behaviors. ecoAmerica’s flagship initiative is MomentUs, a new strategic organizing and communications initiative designed to build a game-changing increase in personal and institutional support for climate change solutions. Learn more at the ecoAmerica website.

The American Psychological Association, in Washington, D.C., is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States. APA’s membership includes nearly 130,000 researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants and students. Through its divisions in 54 subfields of psychology and affiliations with 60 state, territorial and Canadian provincial associations, APA works to advance the creation, communication and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people’s lives.